Take time for you

Quarantine can be hard – It doesn’t matter if you’re living with other people or all on your own, things can get tough. Make sure you take time out for yourself to re-centre and catch your breath. Little things like picking up a good book, listening to music in your room or taking a bath allow you to switch off from everything that’s happening in the world and focus on something that you enjoy.

 

TRY THIS:
Limit exposure to the news. Read and watch what you need to and then walk away or change the channel. Remember that there are also more positive things happening in the world, and it’s important to focus on these too as they help to provide hope and lift your mood.

Maintain a healthy dose of optimism

Though this is a significant event, the world will recover from this – even if it feels chaotic right now. In our grandparents’ lifetime, they lived through polio, tuberculosis, typhoid, pertussis, measles and influenza outbreaks. NZ has recovered from those pandemics and we have learnt from them. We will do so again.

 

TRY THIS:
Limit exposure to the news. Read and watch what you need to and then walk away or change the channel. Remember that there are also more positive things happening in the world, and it’s important to focus on these too as they help to provide hope and lift your mood.

Keeping each other safe & well

Right now, it can feel a bit like the world is being tipped upside down, so it’s helpful to keep some things top of mind. Most importantly, the role we all have to play in protecting the vulnerable in our community – our elders and those whose immunity may be compromised. Amidst the challenges we’re faced with right now, just remind yourself – the most important thing is to care for and protect each other.

 

TRY THIS:
Regularly check in with your elderly or vulnerable neighbours, to see if they’re OK or if they need help picking up mediations or groceries. Remember to follow the Ministry of Health’s guidelines at all times and maintain social distancing when dropping goods off.

Help promote calm

Our emotions are contagious. During times of stress, it is easy to pass on our stress to others without realising. For example, panic buying goods can send other shoppers into a frenzy and discussing how bad things are can be terrifying for younger kids. Help promote calm by being mindful of what you say and the information you take in. Talk in a way that helps children feel safe, while reassuring them that this situation is temporary.

TRY THIS:
Limit exposure to the news. Read and watch what you need to and then walk away or change the channel. Remember that there are also more positive things happening in the world, and it’s important to focus on these too as they help to provide hope and lift your mood.

Stay Connected

Even though everyone is social distancing, it’s important to remain connected. So, phone friends and family, or connect through social media, text and email. Check-in with each other regularly. When working from home remember your colleagues are going through the same thing. Touch base with them on how they’re coping with the change in working style and try to maintain your regular chit chat and office humour. It makes a big difference to your working day when you know that you’re not in it alone. The most socially connected people are the ones that remain the most resilient in times of adversity.

TRY THIS:
Schedule time to ‘connect on purpose’. When you would normally stop work to chat with workmates, do the same via phone, text or video.

Keep Healthy 

On top of washing your hands and regularly cleaning surfaces, it’s important to stay physically and mentally healthy. Get enough sleep, eat a healthy diet and regularly exercise – these are all key for a healthy immune system. While they can’t guarantee you won’t catch the virus, they’ll put you in the best possible position for fighting it off.

TRY THIS:
Use the alarm on your phone to remind you to get up and exercise. Regular five minute bursts of exercise spread throughout the day can help boost your mood and keep energy levels high. Try having a walk around the garden, doing the vacuuming, or playing a quick game with the kids.

Get a good night’s sleep

Practice good sleep hygiene – make sure your bedroom is cool, dark and quiet. Keep digital devices out of your bedroom to avoid blue light before bedtime. Blue light disrupts melatonin production – a hormone responsible for helping you get to sleep and stay asleep. Exercise is also important for sleep health. Try getting outside for a walk when you can.

Reach out for help

Resilient people aren’t necessarily those who plow on – they’re the ones that reach out for help when they need it. It’s normal to feel stressed and anxious during this time, and it can be helpful to talk to someone. If your workplace has an EAP service, then this might be the time to contact them. Alternatively, the government offers a free counselling service that’s available 24/7. You just text or call 1737 to talk to a counsellor.